What the Fish Happened….?

By Liangy Fernandez-Calli and Mary Benton

What a horrifying sight and smell to wake up to.

In recent days, our beautiful Biscayne Bay has been marred by scenes straight out of an apocalyptic movie with thousands of dead fish washing ashore from North Miami to Virginia Key. After multiple water samples and abiotic samples were collected and independently examined by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Miami Department of Environmental Resources Management, Florida International University, and Miami Waterkeeper, it was determined that the cause lies in a lack of dissolved oxygen (DO) due in part to warm temperatures, coupled with sewage leaks, septic tanks, pet waste, stormwater runoff, pesticides and nutrients found in fertilizers which feed algae that depress oxygen levels.

Unfortunately, this is not new.  For decades, environmentalists have been sounding the alarm to deaf ears.  It is a real problem that has been worsening with time due to lack of awareness, lack of leadership and failure to actively participate in better practices. In other words, it is on us to save our beloved Biscayne Bay and the other waterways around South Florida.

All is not lost. We have an opportunity to help restore and conserve our Biscayne Bay and our surroundings altogether.  In some cases, it is a matter of simply changing our habits.  In others, we need to change our mindsets.  

Pet and Human Waste 

Cramer doesn’t want to be part of the problem.

Let’s start with the easiest habit to change: pick up after your pet.  We know most of you already do so, since you likely would be persona non grata in your neighborhood if you didn’t.  But keeping your pet waste from getting washed into the bay is an additional reason to be a good citizen not only of your neighborhood, but of this planet.

Septic systems are another source of contamination for nearby waterways.  The EPA has some good tips on how to deal with yours, from toilet to drainfield.

 

Fertilizer Use

If you must use chemical fertilizer, please be mindful and read the label, ensuring that the product is a slow release fertilizer.

Miami Waterkeeper (MWK) is an organization whose mission is to defend, protect, and preserve South Florida’s watershed through citizen engagement and community action rooted in sound science and research.  They work to ensure swimmable, drinkable, fishable water for all.  There is compelling scientific evidence for the need for ordinances governing the use of fertilizers, including the following provisions:

  • No phosphorus application
  • No fertilizer applied during the summer rainy season
  • 50% slow release Nitrogen
  • 15 ft. setback from waterways and storm drains

Miami Dade County does not have such an ordinance, but there is no reason why you can’t go ahead and follow these provisions on your own.  Learn more about the problem and what you can do to be part of the solution.

 

Composting

Composting is an easy way to add nutrient rich soil that benefits your plants and the environment.  Photo by Sipakorn Yamkasikorn from Pexels.

You can make your very own environmentally-friendly fertilizer for free by composting your kitchen and garden scraps.  Why is this important?  When you toss your kitchen waste in the trash can, it ends up in a plastic bag that will never decompose that gets trucked to a landfill where the kitchen scraps will create methane, a powerful greenhouse gas that is contributing to climate change and the global warming that is sickening bodies of water like Biscayne Bay.  The same thing happens if your municipality requires you to bag your leaves, which make wonderful mulch that enriches your soil, conserves moisture, and suppresses weeds.  By composting, you become part of the solution rather than contributing to the problem.  You will be amazed at the rich soil that will result, that you can spread around on plants that can use a little fertilizer.  Here is a link for more information on how to start composting from the EPA and information that runs the gamut from closed bins to pit composting to open bins, tumblers, piling, and vermicomposting from Fine Gardening.  

 

Plant Native and Florida-Friendly

This is a called a lawn, but it is really a dead zone that requires herbicides to kill weeds, insecticides to kill lawn pests, and chemical fertilizers to give it that nice green color.  It also requires lots of irrigation in the form of our drinking water.  And let’s not forget the polluting power of lawn equipment required to keep this dead zone tidy looking.  This no longer makes sense in a world where fish are dying by the thousands. 

 

This lovely native groundcover is known variously as Fogfruit, or Frogfruit, or Turkey tangle or Creeping Charlie. It doesn’t require any chemicals to maintain it, it provides nectar for hungry bees and butterflies, and it feeds the caterpillars of several butterfly species.  For ideas about other native plants you can use in place of sod, you can search the Florida Native Plant Society website or that of the Institute for Regional Conservation’s Natives for your Neighborhood, narrowing your search down by site conditions and other considerations.  You will lower your carbon footprint and reduce the amount of chemical contamination in our aquifer and Biscayne Bay.

 

Marjory Stoneman Douglas was ahead of her time. Let’s not be behind ours. Photo taken at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Nature Center on Key Biscayne.
We determine the world our children inherit with the actions we take today.

Tips and Resources for an Ultra-Productive Garden

 

by Carrie Spencer of thespencersadventures.net

Thriving gardens don’t just happen. As nice as that would be, a truly productive garden stems from good planning, hard work, and nurturing. Read on for some tips and resources that will help you plant an amazing garden that is a pleasure to behold—and to work in.

 

What’s Your Type?

Photo by Athena from Pexels

 

Chances are you’re starting with some idea of what you would like to grow in your garden. Take a moment to think about all the types of gardens that are out there, as well as what suits you best.

 

  • What aesthetic style suits your property and preferences?
  • Consider what purpose your garden will serve.
  • Think about the growing arrangement you prefer as well.
  • You can even grow an indoor garden if you live in an apartment or condo.

 

Consider Plant Health

Photo by Lisa Fotios from Pexels

Without proper considerations, your plants might not thrive, or even survive. Ensure they have the best possible growing conditions, regardless of your arrangement.

 

  • Plants pull nutrients from the soil, so have yours tested to verify quality.
  • Sun exposure is an important aspect of growing healthy plants.
  • Know what growing zone you live in.
  • If you’re adding soil to a raised bed or container, learn about what choices you should make.
  • Learn how to minimize pests and diseases.

 

Tools and Tricks

Photo by Lisa Fotios

Whether your garden sprawls around your landscape or is in a handful of pots, there are tools and tricks that will help you stay on top of tending it.

 

  • Composting is a great way to add nutrients to your soil.
  • Not into composting? You can still put your kitchen scraps to use!
  • Consider adding a misting system to ease watering.
  • Containers are particularly prone to drying out in hot weather. Some water-saving strategies help your potted plants thrive.
  • Consider some tech tools that strengthen your green thumb!
  • Bound by Beauty offers some ideas on how you can attract butterflies to your garden.

 

Are you ready to dig in? A great garden will take some work, but these tips and resources will ease you through!

 

 

 

Natives for Neighbors: Creating a More Beautiful, Resilient, and Sustainable Community

What are Natives for Neighbors?

by Mary Benton and Monica Gross

 

For many students, this is their first interaction with a native plant. Check out the joy on Tamarah’s face!

Bound by Beauty (BbB), in collaboration with middle and high school teachers Monica Gross and Frank Mataska and their students at Doctors Charter School (DCS), BbB’s Network of Neighborhood Nurturies, TreeHuggers LLC, as well as other members of the community, launched Natives for Neighbors as a pilot program in the 2019/2020 school year.  This program is designed to teach students about the role and importance of plant and animal species that are native to South Florida ecosystems, and to help them gain an understanding of both the negative and positive impacts humans can have on these communities.  In studying the problems humans cause such as habitat destruction and pesticide use, students identify concrete actions to help solve them. 

Thanks to Natives for Neighbors, 7th grade DCS students planted over 60 native trees, shrubs, and wildflowers, including 10 donated to the school by Fairchild’s Connect to Protect Network, providing habitat for butterflies, bees, and other insects that are essential for the survival of the natural world, including our own survival as humans.  By increasing the number of locally-grown trees and shrubs that sequester carbon, cool our community, filter our groundwater, and protect our food supply by providing habitat for pollinators, students play a direct role in making our community more beautiful, resilient, and sustainable.  

How does the program work?

l-r: Kaiya, Tsenat, Kelsey, Amanda, and Sophia were thrilled to take their plants home.

Native trees, shrubs, and wildflowers are either donated by members of BbB’s nurturies, or purchased from area nurseries.  Students identify a location in their yards or communities, and choose a plant that will thrive in those conditions. Students learn practical skills such as how to plant and nurture native plants at school, and take those lessons home with them, along with their new plants.  After transplanting the plants in their own gardens, students continue to nurture and observe them, while studying the relationships that these plants have with their living and nonliving environment, and how they form viable solutions to human-caused environmental problems.  According to a follow-up survey nearly half of the students reported seeing an increase in the amount of wildlife such as birds, butterflies, and other insects in their gardens from one plant alone! 

Sustainability

Students will learn how to identify, harvest, and nurture seeds and seedlings from their own plants, sharing those seeds with members of the community, Brockway Library’s seed collection, and the seedlings and their planting and nurturing skills with friends and neighbors.  This project will grow organically as more native plants are planted every year, and more seeds and seedlings are available for harvest and sharing.  In addition to increased knowledge among students, there will be a growing interest among neighbors in participating in this collaboration.  Students will create an identification chart of natives to instruct others, and share that and other useful information via the school’s website so as to encourage others in the community to participate. 

Shiny-leaf wild coffee produces berries beloved by birds, and little white flowers that smell like honey and attract all sorts of pollinators. They are very easy to propagate from seedlings.

Every year, the community will achieve increased canopy cover and cooler temperatures that offset global warming as new groups of middle school students plant their natives.  Finally, their work outdoors will have an additional long-lasting impact because student participants will gain a greater appreciation for nature.  Imagine what can be achieved if more area schools joined in their efforts to make more and more native plants thrive in our community!

Saving Butterflies 101: Stronger Together

Painted Bunting, photo by Michael Faisal Green

Stronger

 What does a Painted Bunting have to do with making our community stronger, block by block? Michael Faisal Green, who is very knowledgeable about birds, advised me to keep an ear out for the Cardinal’s ‘chip’ call as Painted Buntings often forage for food together with their cousins. Sure enough, that is how I frequently spot this gorgeous and elusive bird in my garden. I was reminded of the large flocks of diverse bird species my husband and I saw when we lived in Costa Rica.

Michael went on to explain that birds often travel in communities, increasing the number of eyes and ears that can detect predators, and using the skills of different species to protect them and forage for food. How clever of them, and what a perfect metaphor for how neighbors working together on a block are stronger as a group than each resident is on their own.

As was mentioned in an earlier blog post on the goal of creating a safer block, we have a wonderful mix of neighbors, including urban planners, lawyers, former law enforcement, construction, engineers, vegetable and pollinator gardeners, and so on. Imagine how much stronger combining those skills and that experience makes us as a unit.

The idea that we are stronger together makes a lot of sense, but how do we put that into practice as neighbors? We have to start by getting together, as I wrote in the last blog. We had a lot of ideas as to how we can actually live this notion. A lot of what makes us safer also makes us stronger, like simply getting to know our neighbors.

We are safer and stronger if we have more eyes and ears out for the local equivalent of predators that threaten a flock. Our multiple ring doorbells and security systems make us stronger as a unit than we are individually, enabling us to share information with each other and with the police in the event of a crime.

We are safer and stronger together if we join forces to prepare for and clean up after hurricanes or other major storm events. This photo shows a group of us gathered in advance of Hurricane Irma’s arrival back in September 2017 to discuss what we were doing to prepare individually and as a group, and how we could manage the aftermath. It gave us all a stronger sense of security, which is a great thing to feel when a hurricane is barreling down.

Neighbors gathered together to touch base and make plans before the arrival of Irma.

Those of us with trees on our properties like the idea of joining forces to get a block discount on a tree trimming service with a certified arborist, that can help prepare us for winds that might bring down weakened limbs. Most of our neighbors who lost power during Irma did so because of limbs bringing electrical lines down. The block discount saves us money, and the joint preparation and cleanup after makes us safer and stronger. A mountain of tree limbs is very daunting to face on one’s own.

A mountain of fallen tree limbs.

Last but not least, we discussed the fact that we are stronger as a group, with a louder voice, if we join forces to bring about positive change in our village. We will be looking for ways in which we can make a difference together as neighbors to make our community safer, stronger, healthier, more beautiful, resilient and sustainable. Stay tuned for a recounting of what we discussed about making our blocks healthier. And start thinking about doing something similar on your block. Come hurricane season, you’ll be glad you did.

Pollinator Parade at Green Day Miami Shores

Miami Shores police stopping traffic on NE 6th Avenue.

STOP…….and imagine a world where kids take to the streets in a peaceful manner to demand that adults start taking action to protect their futures….   We found some old photos dated 4/19/1972 in Flashback Miami Shores, showing Miami Shores police stopping traffic on NE 6th Avenue so the elementary school students could march against pollution.  Wow!  What happened?  When did children stop marching against pollution?  How can we get them re-engaged in the world around them? 

These photos inspired us at Bound by Beauty to do something to activate and inspire young people to take to the streets again.  What better way to empower them than a positive Pollinator Parade that would be tons of fun and would educate people about the importance of pollinators?   We found willing partners in Inspiration Pollination, and Pesticide-free Miami Shores.  Inspiration Pollination is a nationwide collective that uses art to connect the public with the plight of pollinators, and Pesticide-free Miami Shores is an offshoot of Pesticide Free Miami, a coalition working towards local policy banning harmful pesticides and herbicides in public spaces.

 

Melanie Oliva, the inspiration behind Inspiration Pollination, came up with a winning logo for the parade, and we handed out butterfly fans to various schools and community organizations to create a “buzz.”  Come join us on Saturday to celebrate the pollinators that make our lives possible!  Wear a costume, make a sign, bring a musical instrument, and get ready to have fun and make history in Miami Shores in the first annual Pollinator Parade at #GreenDayMiamiShores!  Pssst, there will be face painting too, from 3:30-4:30 at the Bound by Beauty booth!